Protect Your Wishes, Protect Your Assets, for Free

Certainty the National Will Register


Protect Your Wishes, Protect Your Assets, for Free

Tuesday, April 30, 2019 11:00 AM

LAPWORTH, UK / ACCESSWIRE / April 30, 2019 / Do you have a Will? Well if the answer is yes, May 2019 will see the first ever Free Will Registration Month.

Throughout May you can go online and register your Will with The National Will Register.

The National Will Register which is operated by Certainty, and is endorsed by The Law Society of England & Wales, was set-up over a decade ago to help ensure that after a death a Will, and the last version of it, can be found. Today over 8 million Wills are now in the registration system. This means that after someone dies and before probate is granted, a Will can be located for a loved one and only by a person named in the Will (the executors and beneficiaries).

Registering a Will is a vital process that prevents families, beneficiaries and executors suffering additional stress because they either cannot find the Will, are not sure if they hold the last Will or are unaware if a Will was ever written.

Being able to locate a Will quickly after a death removes the additional emotional turmoil the family can face hunting through their loved one's possessions. If they do find a copy of a Will, they then have to work out if it is indeed the last Will written and will need to understand where the original is stored, as the original document will be required to distribute the estate. This can be very distressing and create unnecessary uncertainty at a difficult time.

When it's time to distribute the estate, the responsibility lies with the executor to distribute the estate correctly, a process more commonly known as 'probate'. The executor is financially liable for any errors made during distribution It is therefore absolutely imperative that the executors can locate the Will and distribute the assets in line with the Will.

Remember, if you've written a Will and it cannot be found then your estate will be distributed under the rules of intestacy. Therefore posing the threat that those who you may have outlined to inherit could be left with nothing.

To register your Will visit www.nationalwillregister.co.uk and enter the code FreeWillReg when asked. You do not need a copy of your Will to register it and the register does not need to see your Will.

About Us

Certainty the National Will Register is the legally accredited and recognised National Will Register for the United Kingdom and is chosen, endorsed and used by the public, legal profession, law firms, Will writers, PI insurers, Government agencies, charities, the public and other associated sectors and organisations to Register Wills and Search for Wills.

Thousands of law firms have led the way with Certainty to build a National Will Register and National Will Search Service over the last decade. Certainty provides fundamental protection for executors, beneficiaries and administrators and the probate profession distributing estates by minimising the risk of another Will being discovered after the estate has been distributed.

At least 1 in every 10 Certainty Will searches in 2018 resulted in a Will being discovered where the estate was presumed intestate or a later, unknown Will being brought to light. A Will Search checks to see if a Will has been registered with Certainty the National Will Register and also conducts a nationwide geographically-targeted search for Wills that have not been registered (includes Certainty member and non-member law firms as well as Will Writers from the two main organisations, Institute of Professional Will Writers and The Society of Will Writers).

The National Will Register has over 8 million Will records in the system (and increasing daily). Notable Will registration peaks include, 47,327 registered in a day, 103,000 Wills being registered in 72 hours and 270,000 in one month.

Contacts

Stevie Fisher
Work: 0330 100 3660
[email protected]

Links

www.nationalwillregister.co.uk

SOURCE: Certainty the National Will Register


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